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Activities

Activities

Exploring Mas Ubud

You are invited to learn to carve a Mask from one of the famous local artists in Mas Village. I Wayan Muka was born in a family of mask carvers, and have been familiar with this art since childhood. Being born and growing up in Bali, he was accustomed to religious rituals full of masks. The artistic blood that he got from his father made him interested in learning to make masks since childhood. In the past, he and his father only made masks specifically for religious rituals because Balinese masks were not commonly sold or commercialized. In the 1970s, many Balinese masks were in demand by tourists, and eventually, many artists turned to make masks for commercial purposes, tourism, and promoting Balinese culture. That’s why he started to take the initiative to produce his masks and then continued to build his workshop in the 1980s. You will be taught to complete your work on this excursion, which it will be given to you as a souvenir.

Activities

The Journey Through the Lens

This full-day tour is for those who want to see some of the most photogenic places in Bali. Whether sunrise or sunset, your guide will get you to the right place at the right time. Capture amazing photos by a professional photographer with subjects of spectacular landscapes, people, architecture, exotic wildlife, flora, and fauna. There is no doubt that Bali is a paradise for photography.

Activities

Melukat (Balinese Purification Journey)

“Melukat” is a Balinese word for a purification ceremony that Balinese believe could spiritually purify the mind and soul of humans. Melukat aims to remove and cleanse any lousy influence from the present and a past life. Balinese used to do this ceremony in two kinds of places; the first is in a “Griya” (House of Balinese priest) and is led by a Brahmana (Balinese Priest). The second is in a holy spring, which is believed to have spiritual healing power, with some prepared “Banten” (Balinese offering). We invite you to witness this Melukat ceremony in one of the sacred holy springs in the village of Sebatu. The Holy spring at Sebatu, located 40 minutes drive from GDAS Bali, has been well-known by Balinese all over the island for its healing power, particularly for young new married who wish their married life to be blessed.

Activities

Melali Ke Carik

Through this activity, your guide will explain the philosophy and its application to the Balinese way of life. The excursion begins with a visit to Banjar; Banjar means ‘neighborhood.’ The smallest form of local government in Bali is the Banjar. It is a local community group that acts as a village government system and village council. It is independent of the police and cares of the village community’s cultural and religious values. Every village has its own Banjar,, and its members are the married men of the community. Continued to Delve deeper into Bali’s serene beauty and tradition by spending a day in the life of a local farmer, looking at how rice is cultivated, its religious significance, and how rice culture – planting, growing,, and harvesting – is linked to temple ceremonies. To the Balinese, rice is a direct gift from God and is treated with the utmost care and respect. Stop for a picnic Lunch in a rice field pavilion, known as a Kubu, surrounded by lush greenery and shimmering water and ending with a stop at our resort.

Activities

Cycling Di Desa

We provide a cycling trip and invite you to discover the rural part of Bali, particularly the Village of Mas, with its beautiful rice field, and view their traditional way of life. The more you pedal your bike, the more authentic living you will discover. Our activities coordinator would take you from the Gdas Bali to villages with the beauty of Balinese people along the road and make a few stops to see farmers working in their rice fields, temples,, and traditional Balinese market. We will stop to see the people making a wood carving at Mas Village, then back to Gdas Bali Resort.

Activities

Culinary Delight

This half-day journey will start with an early morning trip to the local traditional market in Mas Village. This kind of market showcases the daily morning activities of the local community, making preparations for their meals. Here you will find everything from exotic fruits, vegetables, spices, flowers, and all the essential elements for canang,  the daily offerings. You will be introduced to some ingredients and dishes which are fresh and locally produced. After shopping at the market, you will be invited to our live kitchen to join in preparation with our Chef, who will help you create your own delicious Authentic Vegan Food. Once the cooking is completed, you can savor your culinary efforts at Tangi Restaurant.

Activities

Traditional Techniques To Make Your Silver Jewelry

Spend a few hours at our local silver–smith classes, and you will get an excellent insight into our traditional Balinese way of life and silver making.

Handcrafted jewelry is a rarity in these modern times, and Bali is one of the last places in the world where such methods are still practiced; your support helps keep this tradition alive. Every jewelry element is painstakingly crafted by hand, using traditional techniques, such as the intricate tasks of shaping, filling, decorating, and finishing. Upon completing your day with us, we are confident that you will leave with the feeling of the world long forgotten and hopefully a beautiful piece of Bali magic. The Class is located at Celuk Village (the SilverSmith Village).

Activities

A Day with an Artisan

Balinese paintings are known for their different styles and artistic themes. Balinese paintings can be classified into classic and modern. Until the 1920s, before the influence of Dutch and international artists living on the island, classical Balinese paintings were known to follow the Kamasan style, named after a village in the Klungkung regency in East Bali. An excellent example of Kamasan-style paintings can be seen covering the ceilings of the Kertagosa Hall of Justice in the center of Klungkung, with inspiration drawn from wayang (shadow puppet) figures, depicting episodes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata epics. Modern paintings emerged after western artists – German painter Walter Spies, Dutch painters Rudolf Bonnet and Arie Smit, and Belgian Adrien-Jean Le Mayeur – offered a European take on the classic Balinese styles. Most of the themes then evolved to depict scenes of Bali’s allure as seen through the eyes of travelers, ranging from the island’s beautiful natural landscapes, agricultural activities, and fishing village scenes. Some modern Balinese paintings are named after their areas – for example, Ubud and Batuan (rural rice fields) and Sanur (fishing village and seascapes). You may also find a Renaissance-like influence in paintings that portray nudes. Balinese artists are known for their creativity, and paintings aren’t only bound to the canvas. The village of Batuan, 11 km outside Ubud, is a commune of painters famous for their eggshell and seashell paintings and carvings in various styles and sizes.

We invite you to learn to make Modern Paintings (Ubud Style) on this excursion. Spend the day with a local artist called Dayu Indah, learning about and trying your hand at painting and crafts. Dayu Indah is a local artist and a Balinese professional dancer; she will teach you and show you how to paint from the beginning till the end. This excursion can be completed in the comfort and privacy of your villa or any of the resort’s picturesque locations.

Activities

The Art Wayang

In Indonesia, primarily in Java and Bali, shadow puppet plays are known as Wayang-Kulit. Wayang is the Indonesian word for “theater.” Puppet Theater emerged with the introduction of Hinduism to Indonesia in the 1st century A.D. and was used to spread the Hindu religion. When Islam started to spread throughout Indonesia, the display of God or Gods in human form was prohibited, so the Wayang style of puppetry was suppressed. Making a wayang figure suitable for a performance involves handwork that takes several hours, working with the artists together. They start from master models (typically on paper), which are traced out onto parchment, providing the figures with an outline and indications of any holes that need to be cut (such as for the mouth or eyes). The figures are then smoothed, usually with a glass bottle, and primed. The structure is inspected, and eventually, the details are worked through. A further smoothing follows before individual painting, which yet another craftsman undertakes. Finally, the movable parts (upper arms, lower arms with hands, and the associated sticks for manipulation) are mounted on the body, which has a central staff by which it is held. In this class, you will be guided to make and paint your puppet from start to finish for over 2 to 3 hours, depending on your availability.